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Sunday, November 29, 2020 | History

5 edition of Broadcasters and the fairness doctrine found in the catalog.

Broadcasters and the fairness doctrine

Hearing before the Subcommittee on Telecommunications and Finance of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House ... Third Congress, first session, July 26, 1993

by United States

  • 281 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by For sale by the U.S. G.P.O., Supt. of Docs., Congressional Sales Office .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Number of Pages78
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7370317M
ISBN 100160414539
ISBN 109780160414534
OCLC/WorldCa28951189

The Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) fairness doctrine requires radio and television broadcasters to present a balanced and fair discussion of public issues on the airwaves. The doctrine is composed of two primary requirements concerning personal attacks in the context of public issue debates and political editorializing. Within a few years, this censorship campaign had driven conservative broadcasters off hundreds of radio stations; it would be more than a decade before the end of the Fairness Doctrine enabled the. Fairness Doctrine Unfairly Promoted May 1, , Bethany Stotts, Leave a comment Believe it or not, a conference at American University provided strong representation for last summer’s anti-conservative study, “The Structural Imbalance of Political Talk Radio.”.


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Broadcasters and the fairness doctrine by United States Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Federal Communications Commission, the Broadcast Industry, and the Fairness Doctrine: is an institutional history of the Federal Communications Commission between and as it systematically positioned itself to eliminate enforcement of the broadcast fairness doctrine.

The book is arranged chronologically and is based on documentary research and by: 7. The Fairness doctrine: Address of Frederick W. Ford, before the Arizona Broadcasters Association, Camelback Inn, Phoenix, Arizona, December 6, [Frederick W Ford] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Frederick W Ford.

It issued “In the Matter of Editorializing by Broadcast Licensees,” which announced the Fairness Doctrine, and began enforcing it.

defunct Fairness Doctrine, one of the most famous and controversial media policies ever enacted in the United States. The Fairness Doctrine’s longer history, especially its origins in the s, is generally not well known.

To the extent that it does persist in public memory, it is. The "public interest" justification for the fairness doctrine is outlined in Section of the Communications Act of (amended in ). The law required broadcasters to provide "equal opportunity" to "all legally qualified political candidates for any office if they had allowed any person running in that office to use the station." However, this equal opportunity offering did not (and does Author: Kathy Gill.

In Congress amended the Communications Act of to enshrine the Fairness Doctrine into law, rewriting Chapter (a) to read: “A broadcast licensee shall afford reasonable opportunity for discussion of conflicting views on matters of public importance.”.

the effects of the Fairness Doctrine on broadcasters, the FCC abolished the doctrine in The FCC reasoned that increased competition in the marketplace, First Amendment concerns, and. The origins of the fairness doctrine lay in the Radio Act (), which limited radio broadcasting to licensed broadcasters but mandated that the licensees serve the public interest.

The Fairness Doctrine applied only to broadcast licensees, and as a cable television channel, Fox News would in all likelihood never have been constrained by the doctrine's requirement to. “The Fairness Doctrine is a relic of an earlier era when government officials thought they knew best what news and information the American people wanted and needed,” Broadcasters and the fairness doctrine book Fred Upton and Greg Waldon wrote today in a statement.

“The FCC has finally done what it should have done 20 years ago: It has scrapped the Fairness Doctrine. The fairness doctrine of the United States Federal Communications Commission (FCC), introduced inwas a policy that required the holders of broadcast licenses to both present controversial issues of public importance and to do so in a manner that was—in.

In essence, the fairness doctrine required radio and television broadcast licensees to cover important and controversial issues of interest in the community, and to provide opportunity for all.

The Fairness Doctrine, which mandated that broadcast networks devote time to contrasting views on issues of public importance, was meant to level the playing field.

We wrote about FCC Chairman Genachowski’s announcement of the repeal of the Fairness Doctrine as part of the FCC’s repeal of 83 media related rules.

Well, the full text of the repeal was released today, and the Fairness Doctrine really was the only real broadcasters, all of the other deleted rules were even. Inspired by that mandate, reform-minded progressives at the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) enacted the Fairness Doctrine inwhich required broadcasters to provide multiple points of.

equal-time rule, a Federal Communications Commission rule that requires equal air time for all major candidates competing for political office. It was preceded by the fairness doctrine, abolished inwhich required radio and television broadcasters to air contrasting views on controversial public issues.

dealt with the use of a public resource, the FCC promulgates regulations (their own doctrine), Cook wrote a book and it was broadcasted by Billy Hargis, who didn't say nice things about cook (who wasn't present to defend himself), The fairness doctrine requires that Red Lion allow Cook time on air to defend himself, this is done within 24 hours, he was not given the notice, Cook filed a complaint with the FCC.

THE EFFORT by Democrats in both Houses to resurrect broadcasting's "Fairness Doctrine" after a year hiatus suggests the fragility of constitutional values. In this policy briefing, John Samples examines the legacy of the speech-stifling Fairness Doctrine to inform a recent broadcast localism gh the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) has permanently removed the Fairness Doctrine from its regulatory books, localism isn’t going away.

The fairness doctrine, along with the equal time rule, mandated that radio and television broadcasters present issues of public importance in a balanced manner, on the grounds that broadcasters are. But our Government, hesitant to extend First Amendment principles to a powerful new way of communicating, once fettered broadcasters with restrictions like the fairness doctrine.

The piece is written by Steve Almond, who is author of the new book, "Bad Stories: What the Hell Just Happened to Our Country." As Almond points out in the opinion piece, the Fairness Doctrine was created to ensure the public’s airwaves were used for the public good and that broadcasters provided a reasonable opportunity for differing viewpoints to be heard on issues.

#ad#The Fairness Doctrine required broadcasters to air contrasting points of view on controversial issues. It was repealed some 20 years ago, after the commission concluded that the rule was. A guideline included in the Communications Act, the Fairness Doctrine, was created to enforce restrictions on radio and television broadcasting until It was instituted to provide a platform for equal coverage of public issues.

During the past 90 years, radio regulation has varied tremendously. Inin Red Lion Broadcasting Co. FCC, the Supreme Court ruled that the Fairness Doctrine was consti-tutional, concluding that the print and broadcast media were inherently different in terms of regulatory First Amend-ment considerations, especially given the scarcity of available broadcast spectrum The Court held, “[i]t is the right ofFile Size: KB.

many years imposed on broadcasters a "fairness doctrine," requiring that public issues be presented by broadcasters and that each side of those issues be given fair coverage. Here, the FCC declared that petitioner Red Lion Broadcasting Co. had failed to meet its obligation under the fairness doctrine when it carried a program which constituted.

Red Lion Broadcasting Co. FCC, U.S. Supreme Court case that upheld the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) fairness doctrine, stating that if a station makes a personal attack on an individual, it must also give that person an opportunity to respond to the criticism.

The Fairness Doctrine and 83 other "outdated and obsolete media-related rules" were tossed Monday into the regulatory dust bin of the Federal. When Medgar Evers tried to win air time on WLBT in the s and early s, he had on his side the Fairness Doctrine.

This FCC policy directed broadcasters to present programs on controversial public issues and enable those who disagreed to present their opinions on the air. Evers sent his complaints to the FCC, which took little action.

The Fairness Doctrine required broadcasters to afford reasonable opportunity for the airing of both sides of "issues of public importance." The doctrine Author: John Eggerton. In the landmark Red Lion Broadcasting Co.

Inc. FCC inthe court ruled that the Fairness Doctrine was constitutional. Free speech, the justices held, was “the right of the viewers and.

that it has the opposite effect. When it was in effect, the Fairness Doctrine forced broadcasters to self-censor and limit their coverage of controversial subjects.

A return to the Fairness Doctrine would certainly have the same effect. The Fairness Doctrine was formally adopted in It required broadcasters to provide. Witnesses testified on the need for the Fairness Doctrine in the broadcast medium. this first hearing on S. to clarify the congressional intent concerning, and to codify, certain requirements.

("The Fairness Doctrine," National Association of Broadcasters, Backgrounder ().) Even if it may once have been possible to monopolize the airwaves, and to. The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced Wednesday that they are abandoning the so-called Fairness Doctrine, an FCC policy introduced in which requires the holders of broadcast.

These included rules like the Fairness Doctrine, which required that broadcasters dedicate at least some time to covering politically important and controversial issues and that broadcasters do.

H.R. To amend the Communications Act of to reinstate the obligation of broadcast licensees to afford reasonable opportunity for the discussion of conflicting views on issues of public importance (commonly known as the "Fairness Doctrine").

Ina database of bills in the U.S. Congress. Reinstating some form of the Fairness Doctrine today would create a media environment where broadcasters — of any ideological bent — are punished for spreading disinformation and baseless. The Restore the Fairness Doctrine Act would once again mandate television and radio broadcasters present both sides when discussing political or social issues.

Print book: National government publication: EnglishView all editions and formats: Rating: (not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first. Subjects: Broadcasting -- Law and legislation -- United States. Fairness doctrine (Broadcasting) -- United States. Broadcasting -- Law and legislation.

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Kino Korner Prata om det- Med vi vågar! Full text of "Fairness Report" See other formats.Fairness Doctrine. The Fairness Doctrine is a former policy of the United States's Federal Communications Commission. It required broadcast licensees to present controversial issues of public importance, and to present such issues in an honest, equal and balanced manner.

The fairness doctrine dates from the 's, when Federal regulators sought to make sure all sides of an issue were aired by the broadcasting industry, which then consisted only of a .